1. The acronym PACE (probe, alert, challenge, emergency), crated to helps a subo

1. The acronym PACE (probe, alert, challenge, emergency), crated to helps a subordinate speak up regarding an event he or she feels uncomfortable with, involves four steps intended to help improve the communication among the healthcare team with leaders. The first step is about asking for information or clarification; the second is used for staff to voice their concerns; the third involves stating the disagreement with a decision or action. Lastly, the final step is about acting to stop the decision or action (Moneypenny, 2013).2. Do you feel that there is an authority gradient regarding decision making where you work? If so, describe the hierarchy involved. Since I obtain my nursing degree, I have only worked as a private caregiver. While attending clinical before obtaining a nursing degree, this nurse feels there was an authority gradient regarding decision making. Every student was responsible for communicating any concerns about patients to their clinical instructor or the nurse before making any major decisions concerning patient care. The hierarchy involved on patient care in a hospital setting are physicians, nurses, technicians etc. 3. Have you ever been in a position in a work setting where you or someone you know was reluctant to speak up regarding a clinical matter due to a perceived authority gradient? Was there a negative outcome? Looking back, could the matter have been handled differently? In this nurse career, she has not been in a position where someone she knows was reluctant to speak up regarding a clinical matter due to a perceived authority gradient. This nurse, however, had a conversation with a friend about three months ago about a time when at her job, she had an unapproachable nurse manager due to her rudeness. This nurse friend says a new nurse was hesitant to voice her concern regarding a clinical matter. The new nurse finally decided to talk to the charged nurse, and they resolved the problem. Thankfully, there was not a negative outcome. Nurses must have good communication skills to effectively work as a team to provide quality patient care (Underman Boggs, 2016). ReferencesMoneypenny, M. (2013). Axing the totem pole. Medical and Dental Defense Union of Scotland. https://www.mddus.com/resources/publications-library/insight/autumn-2013/axing-the-totem-poleUnderman Boggs, K. (2016). Communication with Other Health Professionals. In E., & K. Underman Boggs (Eds.), Interpersonal relationships: Professional communication skills for nurses (7th ed., p.450). Elsevier.
Requirements: 250+ words   |   .doc file

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *